THE LIGHTHOUSEthe Lighthouse men," he said. He rose andstood in the bow of the boat, very straightand tall, for all the world, James thought, asif he were saying, “There is no God,” andCam thought, as if he were jumpingleapingintospaceeternity, and they both rose to follow him ashe sprung, lightly like a young man, holdinghis parcel, on to the rock.14“He must have reached it,” said Lily Briscoealoud, feeling suddenly completely tired out. Forthe Lighthouse had become almost invisible, hadmelted away into a blue haze, and the effort oflooking at it and the effort of thinking of himlanding there, which both seemed to be one andthe same effort, had stretched her body and mindto the utmost. Ah, but she was relieved. What-ever she had wanted to give him, when he left herthat morning, she had given him at last.“He has landed,” she said aloud. "It isfinished." Then, surging up, puffing slightly, oldMr. Carmichael stood beside her, looking like anold pagan God, shaggy, with weeds in his hairand the trident (it was only a French novel) in hishand. He stood by her on the edge of the lawn,swaying a little in his bulk and said, shading his321
Resize Images  

Select Pane

Berg Materials

View Pane