14621He felt fortified, & forgot completely the little rubs & digs of the evening; [?] itsexasperations & intolerable boredom, feeling now that invigorated by this man'sstrength & sanity & his feeling certainty that belief in the straightforwardsimple things, which Mr. Ramsay felt so strongly that, when it came to thepoor Steenie's drowning, the he could not choke down his tears, &but raising the book a little, sat let them fall, & shook his head fromside to side, & forgot completely what he was doing, save for thesense of his wife there who must not interrupt him - & waskeeping from him he was obscurely conscious, intolerable bores.LetthemIt was done.If they were going to improve upon that, hein hissympathy &sorrow for thepoor old papoor oldparentsthought, finishing as he finished the chapter. And Immediately,he began thinking, how it was the old beggars & fishwives Scott wasmangood at; how the lovers were fiddlesticks.The innocence of theman was incred astonishing.He was contemporary withBalzac after all. But if it hampered him limited him hislack of interest in these eternal sex problems was also a source ofth one reason for his ?vigour. Mr. Ramsay felt that sex interest washugely overdone. If this sort of thing seemed old fashioned to theyoung men, that naturally they did not buy his own books,Mr. Ramsay thought; ?& One ought not to complain; Here helooked at his wife, if they did not read Scott. Here he lookedat his wife, who was reading & knitting, but, like a person in avery light sleep, was conscious of the very moment that herhusband shut his book. She was He often jus liked just to look at herHe liked to think that everyone had taken themselves off, & he & she werealone; just for ten minutes or so

Mrs. Ramsay raised her head, but like a person in alight sleep, seemed to ask say that if he wanted her to wake shewould, otherwise she was sleeping. She was rocking; she wasstretchedsa brooding; on the rhythm, in the mesh stretched tight of Shakespeare'ssonnets.

Well? he said at length. And At once quizzically,as if he were ridiculing her gently, for being asleep in broaddaylight, but & at the same time hiding the delight of her
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