220173of that marriage were quite successful, or seemed so. There werethe two little boys, & But, by degrees perhaps on both sides,at suchthe holes began things worked loose. HeThey came homeat toodifferent hours; to share a bedroom. for some reason, Lilyimagined them meeting on the stairs, Paul in Pyjamas,There were scenes,at firstMinta garish, extravagant, artificially wreathed & tintedabout three o'clock in the morning. To finish the picture,Paul must be surprised carrying a poker, to wa in case ofeatingburglars; Minta cramming sandwiches. So they What didthey say? meeting there in the cadaverous morning light on astaircase which had holes in its carpet, Paul, who kept hisexquisite profile grew had grown withered. His aquiline beauty wascould havedwithwas not perhaps of the kind to improve ?unless, sober ideals,which hadholes, [?] &no beauty.wassordid.thefamily happiness, domesticity: But how let him sit upall night, or act the part of sitting reading.then yawning; & going toit had coarsened, thoughbed. But not with this life - for he had wandered off.debated & was solitaryHe played chess in taverns; coffee houses;He And theForvisitor thought felt how that though there was still an air of(she went to seethem sometimesperhaps he toohad his faults.joviality about the place, a Minta would object toany very ser private conversation between ?you & Paul ?awould object to his, for example, showing one the cucumbers(at the little cottage near Rickmansworth) at greatlength, for then he might be in case he said ?anything: soshe would join them, throwing her arm round his neBut latelyshoulder.Still they remained fond. They did not part; she thoughthad they were settling into another phase together: [?]perhapsas so many did, after all. She thought Mrs. Ramsay wouldthathave been forced to allow much more was possible,She rather suspected that Paul, playing - whatever it might be - in acoffee house, had there met somebody sympathetic; & this,far from breaking the marriage, had righted it. ForMrs Ramsay was really too primitive, But what wouldMrs. Ramsay have said? Mrs. Ramsay would havesaid it was utterly & entirely unthinkable.a perfectlydifferent kind of [?]girl,her sorrowforMrs.Ramsay -gone -utterly
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